Brothers defy odds, finish IRONMAN - WQOW TV: Eau Claire, WI NEWS18 News, Weather, and Sports

UPDATE: Brothers defy odds, finish IRONMAN

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MADISON (WKOW) -- Brothers Kyle and Brent Pease barely slept Sunday night, attributing their wakefulness to adrenaline, after pushing and pulling their way through the grueling IRONMAN Wisconsin competition.

 "It was amazing, an unbelievable experience," said Brent, 30, who supported his brother Kyle, a quadriplegic born with cerebral palsy, through the race. "I didn't think these were the things we would see when Kyle was growing up, but, I mean, he's an IRONMAN! And doing that with him is awesome."

During the triathlon on Sunday, Brent tugged Kyle in a kayak through the water in the 2.4-mile swim, pedaled with Kyle on a specially-designed bike in the 112-mile ride, and then pushed Kyle in a racing chair during the 26.2-mile run.

"I'm very sore today, but it's worth it" Kyle, 28, said. "Just being out there with him and supporting one another."

Brent says that "Kyle borrows my legs, but I borrow his spirit," explaining the races they do together are actually easier to do because the reason for competing transcends the physical. He says that's important, especially when things are not going well.

Sunday, the Pease brothers narrowly missed the 5:30 p.m. cut-off time between the bicycle portion and the marathon. That would have meant they wouldn't be allowed to complete the race.

Brent says they were watching the clock and after 90 miles of biking, had to push themselves even harder to complete the last 22 miles in time. Though, Kyle was not too concerned.

"Maybe a little bit," Kyle said. "But at the end of the day we just kept pushing, kept going. Nothing would have stopped us."

"Kyle is every bit engaged. It's hard for him – his heart rate gets up and he's fighting and working," Brent said.

Though the brothers made the cut off, finishing the IRONMAN competition in 15 hours and eight minutes, there would have been no exception if they had not made it by 5:30 p.m. And the Pease brothers prefer it that way.

"Endurance events don't have any discrimination. There's no special starting line. There's no special accommodations. Everybody has to do the same 140.6 miles. We all do it together and that's really important for us, that we're not doing wheelchair baseball on a special field," Brent said.

The Atlanta-based brothers have competed in more than 20 races together, and established the Kyle Pease Foundation, which provides adaptive sports equipment, mobility devices and medical care to other athletes who are disabled.

"It's one of the strongest bonds I've ever seen," said Sam Harrison, Kyle's caretaker. "They're really, really close. Just doing this together brings them even closer."

For Brent, it's important for people with disabilities such as his brother to have opportunities to play sports.

"It's a can-do attitude," Brent said. "I think that especially as they get older they hear about what they can't do, not what they can do. We believe there's much more to offer and much more to do in this life."

For Kyle, competing and establishing the foundation have provided new opportunities for him.

"It's just opened up so many doors," Kyle said. "I never thought while growing up that this dream would become a reality. And to do it with Brent is amazing."

The Pease brothers plan to compete in the Marine Corp Marathon in Washington on October 27 and the Thanksgiving Day half-marathon in Atlanta. In December, they say they might take the month off -- "maybe."

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MADISON (WKOW) -- Brent Pease pushed and pulled his brother Kyle, a quadriplegic born with cerebral palsy, through the grueling IRONMAN Wisconsin competition.

During the triathlon on Sunday, Brent tugged Kyle in a kayak through the 2.4-mile swim, pedaled with Kyle on a specially-designed bike in the 112-mile ride, and then pushed Kyle in a wheelchair during the 26.2-mile run.

The Atlanta-based brothers have competed in more than 20 races together, and established the Kyle Pease Foundation, which provides adaptive sports equipment, mobility devices and medical care to other athletes who are disabled.

"It's one of the strongest bonds I've ever seen," said Kyle's caretaker Sam Harrison. "They're really, really close. Just doing this together brings them even closer."

Harrison told 27 News that the brothers narrowly missed the 5:30 p.m. cut-off time between the bicycle portion and the marathon, and almost didn't complete the race.

To find out what happened during the race, watch Kyle and Brent Pease live on Monday during the 6:00 a.m. hour of Wake Up Wisconsin. Reporter LiLi Tan will talk to the brothers about their IRONMAN experience.

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