The Latest on health care ruling: Feingold welcomes ruling - WQOW TV: Eau Claire, WI NEWS18 News, Weather, and Sports

The Latest on health care ruling: Feingold welcomes ruling

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MADISON, Wis. (AP) - The latest on Wisconsin reaction to U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding subsidies granted through the federal health exchange:

10:07 a.m.

Democratic Senate candidate Russ Feingold says the U.S. Supreme Court did the right thing by upholding federal subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care law.

Feingold on Thursday called the lawsuit challenging it "partisan and unnecessary." He says it's time to move past the lawsuits, which he calls wasteful.

His reaction is in stark contrast to his opponent, Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson. He says the ruling "cements a system costing millions of Americans the health plans they chose and liked and access to doctors they knew and trusted."

The ruling means that about 183,000 people in Wisconsin who purchase their health insurance through the online exchange won't lose any subsidies they are receiving. More than 90 percent are receiving some subsidies, averaging $315 a month.

10:05 a.m.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker says a U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding the federal health care overhaul means Republicans in Congress must "redouble their efforts to repeal and replace" the law.

Walker issued a statement Thursday through the committee he set up to explore a presidential bid. Walker is a longtime opponent of the law and has frequently called for it to be repealed.

Walker says the law has been a failure and "we need real leadership in Washington, and Congress needs to repeal and replace" it.

Democrats and advocates for the poor are praising the court's ruling, as it means 183,000 Wisconsin residents who purchase insurance through the federal marketplace won't lose subsidies. The average subsidy is about $315 a month.

9:48 p.m.

Democratic state lawmakers in Wisconsin are praising the Supreme Court's ruling upholding federal subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care law, but say more needs to be done.

They are renewing their call for Republican Gov. Scott Walker to accept federal money to expand Medicaid to more low-income people in Wisconsin.

Democratic Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Schilling says it's just common sense for Wisconsin to accept the money that would pay for Medicaid for those earning up to 138 percent of poverty. Walker lowered income eligibility to those earning only up to the poverty level, but also expanded coverage to childless adults previously on a waiting list.

Democratic Sen. Jon Erpenbach says Walker should accept the federal money instead of focusing on his "relentless pursuit of higher office."

9:45 a.m.

Advocates for President Barack Obama's health care law are cheering the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling upholding subsidies for people who purchase insurance through federal exchanges.

Sara Finger, executive director of the Wisconsin Alliance for Women's Health, says Thursday's decision is a "tremendous victory for all of us." She says without the subsidies, thousands of women would no longer be able to afford to purchase health insurance.

Jon Peacock with Wisconsin Children and Families calls the decision a "huge relief." It means there will be no changes for Wisconsin residents who purchase insurance through the federal exchange.

The reaction among politicians in Wisconsin is more divided. Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson decried the ruling, while Gov. Scott Walker issued no immediate comment.

Walker has repeatedly called for the law to be overturned.

9:40 a.m.

Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson says the Supreme Court ruling upholding federal subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care law is "incredibly disappointing."

Johnson says the ruling "cements a system costing millions of Americans the health plans they chose and liked and access to doctors they knew and trusted."

The ruling means that about 183,000 people in Wisconsin who purchase their health insurance through the online exchange won't lose any subsidies they are receiving. More than 90 percent are receiving some subsidies, averaging $315 a month.

Johnson calls the law unaffordable and destructive. He is running for re-election next year against Democrat Russ Feingold.

His campaign had no immediate comment.

9:20 a.m.

Advocates for the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul are expressing relief that they've been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Wisconsin Children and Families research director Jon Peacock said Thursday that the ruling is status quo for the law and those benefiting from the subsidies don't have to worry about losing them.

About 183,000 people in Wisconsin purchase health insurance through the online exchange. More than 9 out of 10 of them receive subsidies.

Gov. Scott Walker had said if the subsidies were struck down, Obama and Congress would have to come up with a solution. But the court's ruling means the subsidies will continue.

Walker had no immediate comment on the ruling.

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