Altoona man's request for court to drop conditions of supervisio - WQOW TV: Eau Claire, WI NEWS18 News, Weather, and Sports

Altoona man's request for court to drop conditions of supervision is denied

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UPDATE: Eau Claire County's District Attorney Gary King is opposing an attempt by a man who committed two murders to be released from supervision.

Cher Cha Moua shot and killed his wife and teenage daughter in 1998.  

He was found not guilty by insanity, and spent eleven years in a mental institution before being released on supervision.
 
As News 18 was the first to report last month, Moua asked a judge to release him from supervision.  

King is now opposing that request for several reasons. Among them, Moua's 2009 suicide attempt, and a judge's finding two years ago that he is still a danger to himself or others.

King also notes that at last month's hearing, Moua admitted at times he still feels overwhelmed, and one of his friends testified sometimes she's still afraid of him.  

Moua's lawyer responded that woman supports termination of the commitment order, saying it would cause him less stress. Moua's lawyer said he's gone six years without any violations of his commitment order.

No new court dates have been set at this point. 
 


November 2017
Eau Claire County (WQOW) --
There's another chapter in a double-murder case News 18 has been following for years. The Altoona man who shot and killed his wife and daughter nearly 20 years ago is once again trying to live without supervision. 

On Friday, Cher Cha Moua testified on his own behalf in hopes of convincing a judge to drop the conditions of his supervision. 

Moua was found not guilty by insanity for the 1998 shooting death of his wife and teenaged daughter. He was released from a state mental institution in 2011, after experts said he was no longer mentally ill. He has been living under supervision ever since. 

That means Moua can't leave the state, or the county, without permission and must still meet with his parole officer once a month. 

On Friday, Moua explained to the court why he feels he should no longer be considered a danger to himself or others. 

"It's not necessary to have somebody watching over [me]," he said in court. "My condition is really good enough. I can move on into my life." 

Moua said his mental health has been consistently stable and that his professional counselor said a year ago that there are no apparent safety concerns. 

After Moua and a friend of his testified, Judge Jon Theisen told prosecutors they have 10 days to submit in writing how they view the evidence and arguments. After that, the defense will have 10 days to respond to the state, which will have another 10 days to respond. 

But for now, Moua will continue living under his current supervision conditions. 

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