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One-on-one with Anita Hill: 30 years after her testimony

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Anita Hill

EAU CLAIRE (WQOW) -- Oct. 11 marked 30 years since Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas began his hearings to be appointed to the bench on the nation's highest court. 

One woman during those hearings became a household name and a face for survivors of sexual violence, Anita Hill. In 1991 she testified against Thomas in front of an all-male senate panel accusing the then Supreme Court nominee of unwanted advances and lewd comments when she worked for him. 

News 18 spoke one-on-one with Hill and asked her what has, and hasn't changed since those hearings. 

"Activism has increased, awareness has increased and in some places work places have actually changed," Hill told News 18. "However what hasn't changed is the huge number of incidences of gender-based violence that have really impacted every institution in our country."

The United Nations defines gender-based violence as any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering whether occurring in public or private. 

Hill also said that she believes justice for survivors will only come when our leaders acknowledge the toxicity of gender-based violence and it's impact on the nation. Also adding that they then need to commit to doing something about it. 

News 18 also asked her what she thinks President Biden, who led those hearings in 1991 and offered her an apology for his role before the 2020 election, should be doing to commit to the problem. 

"Right now, we know that gender-based violence effects people's housing, it effects the jobs, it effects education, it effects their interaction with the criminal justice system and the civil justice system," said Hill. "So we need to be looking at all of these areas in the federal government and coming together with an agenda that is informed by the experience of survivors and victims."

Hill published a book tackling the country's long reckoning with this type of violence since her testimony in 1991. The book titled "Believing" is available now.  

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